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Rachel5197
08-09-2011, 08:33 PM
Hi, I have a 2011 Chevy Equinox with an 1 1/4" hitch and a towing capacity of 3500lbs and 350lbs tongue weight. I am considering buying a 1989 Bayliner open bow. I am being told, "sure my SUV can tow it, just buy the adapter from the 1 1/4" to a 2" receiver. Does this qualify? Is it still considered safe towing? PLEASE SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS, I have never had such a small hitch before.

thudpucker
08-09-2011, 08:55 PM
I dont know what an Equinox is.
Nobody is going out on a limb to advise you on what's safe in towing.
Maybe you should be asking your grandfather. He can see what your looking at and has all those life experiences.

Some of the newer vehicles just dont have enough metal for a trailer hitch.
You might ask at a welding shop or a U-Haul where they install hitches.

Rachel5197
08-09-2011, 09:03 PM
Chevy Equinox is an SUV one of those Crossover vehicles, almost like a station wagon. Let me rephrase my question. Is it possible to tow a 19' foot bayliner Capris Bowrider with my car using the adapter from the installed 1 1/4" to 2" receiver? I have no idea how heavy this boat is. I will definitely contact a U-haul, great idea. I just figured someone who knows about towing boats may be able to tell me if using this adapter is ok or not. It just doesn't seem like it would. Hence the question for anyone who may have an opinion.

thudpucker
08-09-2011, 10:45 PM
It's more complex than you think.
A boat can 'push' your rear end around in a corner.
A sudden stop.....like an accident on the freeway, bringing your vehicle down from Freeway speed to Zero, you may find out the boat and trailer are trying to push you in some direction. You may not notice what's happening till you are jack-knifed...
Even from 30 mph on a wet street, that boat weighes enough to push you through a stop sign.
You might not have enough weight to pull the boat back up the ramp.

I'm guessing your boat, motor n' trailer is about 4000-4500 Lbs. Tongue weitht will be near 200Lbs.
Your vehicle will tow that much easily, but you must be aware of the possibilities knowing you are very nearly using an Ant to haul a loaf of bread around.
U-haul will answer your question about the hitch.

chawk_man
08-10-2011, 06:25 AM
Find the weight of your boat and the tank capacity on the Internet. Be sure to include the weight of the motor. Multiply fuel tank capacity by 6 lbs per gallon. Add all that up, and then add 10% for all the crap you typically store on the boat. If there is a lot of crap, add 15%. Then add the weight of your trailer. The total of all that will be the gross weight of the whole package, and in your case, that cannot exceed 3500 lbs. If it does exceed 3500 lbs, then you will need to get a bigger tow vehicle, or if it is not too far over 3500 lbs, beef up the suspension and hitch of your Equinox - not only the rear suspension, but also the front suspension. You will also likely to need different, stiffer side-wall tires.

If it does not exceed 3500 lbs, you then need to measure the tongue weight and adjust the boat on the trailer so that tongue weight is no less than 6% or gross weight and no more than 10% of gross weight. Then, after thoroughly testing the trailer brakes, take it for a VERY CAREFUL test drive. You want to make sure the boat doesn't start fishtailing a highway speeds, especially if going down hill. If it does fishtail, you will then need to get a special anti-sway distribution hitch. That can run between $500 to $1000.

makomark
10-04-2011, 09:44 AM
Many times, increasing the tongue weight will eliminate the fishtailing trailer.

As far as the capacity goes, the tow vehicle's owners manual should cover all the critical parameters. Most all I've read do a reasonable job of explaining the various measures and capacities. as far as the boat & trailer, the best bet is to get a real weight on a truck scale.

FWIW, pay attention to the tow vehicle needs, especially one with an automatic. The vehicle OEMs don't put any reserve capacity in the fluid coolers unless it is ordered with a towing package. That may or not be adequate. Also, brake lining wear will increase and the fluids will need more frequent attention.

bondo
10-30-2011, 08:17 AM
Chevy Equinox is an SUV one of those Crossover vehicles, almost like a station wagon. Let me rephrase my question. Is it possible to tow a 19' foot bayliner Capris Bowrider with my car using the adapter from the installed 1 1/4" to 2" receiver? I have no idea how heavy this boat is. I will definitely contact a U-haul, great idea. I just figured someone who knows about towing boats may be able to tell me if using this adapter is ok or not. It just doesn't seem like it would. Hence the question for anyone who may have an opinion.

Ayuh,... That adapter will Not increase yer capacity,...

Just like a chain, yer system is only as strong as the Weakest link,...
In yer case, the small, light weight receiver...

RicardoMarine
11-25-2011, 09:36 AM
19' foot bayliner Capri Bowrider
Post the weight question on the BOC forum...... BaylinerOwnersClub.org.
This is a pretty common little boat, and you should receive some responses.
Good place for Bayliner questions as well.
Your 1989 will likely be OMC..... so ME.com is a great place for those questions.

Ditto the comments reguarding braking. If concerned, make sure that your trailer has decent brakes on it.
Note that Surge Brakes are not legal in some countries.... Canada, for example.

Give yourself much more of the following:

Distance between you and the vehical in front of you.
Greater anticipated stopping distance.
Turning radius.
Slower speeds when cornering.
Load more of your gear into the two vehical than into the boat (a common mistake often made).


.

joyee
02-28-2012, 09:21 AM
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